Weight loss Surgery

It is said that if you want to lose weight then you need to eat healthy and workout. But there are those who have tried it all and the only option remaining is weight loss surgery. There are several ways to do this.

When you get weight loss surgery, your surgeon makes changes to your stomach or small intestine, or both. Here are the four methods surgeons typically use:

Gastric Bypass: Your doctor may call this "Roux-en-Y" gastric bypass, or RYGB. The surgeon leaves only a very small part of the stomach (called the pouch). That pouch can't hold a lot of food, so you eat less. The food you eat bypasses the rest of the stomach, going straight from the pouch to your small intestine. This surgery can often be done through several small incisions using a camera to see inside (laparoscope). Doctors can also perform a mini-gastric bypass, which is a similar procedure also done through a laparoscope.

Adjustable Gastric Band: The surgeon puts a small band around the top of your stomach. The band has a small balloon inside it that controls how tight or loose the band is. The band limits how much food can go into your stomach. This surgery is done using a laparoscope.

Gastric Sleeve: This surgery removes most of the stomach and leaves only a narrow section of the upper part of the stomach, called a gastric sleeve. The surgery may also curb the hunger hormone ghrelin, so you eat less.

Sourced from: http://www.webmd.com/diet/obesity/surgery-for-you

Most people who want weight loss surgery don’t have the entire information. First and foremost, if you have a sweet tooth then you will end up having bad days. Your new digestive system process the sugar so fast and what results is diarrhea if not sweating. You will then also have to convince your insurance company that the surgery is a must.

The Surgery Results in Uncontrollable Shitting

Here's what you need to know right away: if you've had surgery for weight loss, you're vulnerable to "dumping syndrome," which is exactly what it sounds like. It happens when foods that are high in sugar or simple carbohydrates, aka everything that tastes good, get processed too quickly by your newly-neutered digestive system, resulting in sweating, shaking, intense cramps, vomiting, and of course, uncontrollable diarrhea.

Just Convincing Them You Need the Surgery Is Hard as Hell

The cost of bariatric surgery is usually covered by insurance, though not out of the charitable altruism these companies are known for. Successful patients will almost certainly experience fewer health problems down the line, so paying five figures now means not paying six figures later. Before they'll pay up, however, they require pages and pages of proof that you're not faking the whole thing (presumably with a fat suit like Martin Lawrence in Big Momma's House).

Sourced from: http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-1482-6-bizarre-things-nobody-tells-you-about-weight-loss-surgery.html

So who exactly qualifies for weight loss surgery? Someone who’s BMI is above 40 and they also battle health conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure.

Research supports the benefits of weight loss surgery for those with a BMI between 35 and 39.9 with obesity related health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis and other obesity related conditions. You could be a candidate for surgical weight loss if you meet any of the following criteria:

You are more than 100 lbs. over your ideal body weight.

You have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of over 40.

You have a BMI of over 35 and are experiencing severe negative health effects, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, related to being severely overweight.

You are unable to achieve a healthy body weight for a sustained period of time, even through medically-supervised dieting.

Sourced from: http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/bariatric-and-metabolic-institute/candidate